Saturday, December 3, 2016

Coca-Cola 130th Anniversary Celebration Harlequin Diamond Aluminum Bottle Netherlands 2016



In 1961 brought about the first real generation change in cans for Coke. They introduced the first bottle design within the diamond for the first time. 

1966 saw another generation change as Coke moved to the Harlequin design that is sometimes indicated as the small diamond can. The first version is available as a flat and a pull top, with the flat top being a much tougher find. The distinction between the first and second version of this can is made by the placement of the "Contents 12 FL OZS". The first version has it at the top, while the second, available only as a pull tab for the first time, shows it at the bottom.

The final version of this can made it's appearance in 1967. It was Coke's first effort at using an all aluminum design. This can is easily distinguished from its predecessor due to the indented ridge at the top lid and the curved aluminum shape at the base with no true bottom lid. In addition, the All Aluminum statement is made on the bottom of the can. A second and more common all aluminum can quickly made it's debute, but this time the all aluminum statement was on the side of the can.

The harlequin designs remained in use until the next generation change which took place in 1970 as coke moved to it's spiral design which we are still familiar with today. Take a look at the first spiral design can, a very difficult to find two panel dull red flap top - notice that the one content line lists "Carmel Colored" as the only item. This can was also available in metallic paint. The second spiral design, released in 1971 had a shorter "Coke" on the side panel, yet still only listed one content line. It is also available in dull red or metallic paint.



1961 brought about the first real generation change in cans for Coke. They introduced the first bottle design within the diamond for the first time. The can pictured was loaned from the collection of Fred Dobbs. It is similar to the second design, which appeared in 1963, but without the large 12 OZ labels above left and below right of the diamond. The other important detail of the bottle design is that all three can be found in the earlier punch top which required a church key to open as well as with an early design of the pull tab.


Second generation diamond bottle can - probably the most commonly seen!
Click image for a higher resolution picture

The third and final change, which made its first appearance in 1965, for the bottle design was again to remove the large 12 OZ indicators above and below the diamond and to replace them with a single, smaller line stating "Contents 12 FL OZS" which can be found at the base of the diamond.

Although the bottle design cans are much more common than the ealier plain diamond cans, they are nonetheless, still very desirable.

1966 saw another generation change as Coke moved to the Harlequin design that is sometimes indicated as the small diamond can. The first version is available as a flat and a pull top, with the flat top being a much tougher find. The distinction between the first and second version of this can is made by the placement of the "Contents 12 FL OZS". The first version has it at the top, while the second, available only as a pull tab for the first time, shows it at the bottom.

The final version of this can made it's appearance in 1967. It was Coke's first effort at using an all aluminum design. This can is easily distinguished from its predecessor due to the indented ridge at the top lid and the curved aluminum shape at the base with no true bottom lid. In addition, the All Aluminum statement is made on the bottom of the can. A second and more common all aluminum can quickly made it's debute, but this time the all aluminum statement was on the side of the can.

The harlequin designs remained in use until the next generation change which took place in 1970 as coke moved to it's spiral design which we are still familiar with today. Take a look at the first spiral design can, a very difficult to find two panel dull red flap top - notice that the one content line lists "Carmel Colored" as the only item. This can was also available in metallic paint. The second spiral design, released in 1971 had a shorter "Coke" on the side panel, yet still only listed one content line. It is also available in dull red or metallic paint.

Monday, October 31, 2016

Coca-Cola Amsterdam Aluminum Bottle 2016 Netherlands







Amsterdam (/ˈæmstərdæm, ˌæmstərˈdæm/;[9][10] Dutch: [ɑmstərˈdɑm] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous municipality of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Its status as the capital is mandated by the Constitution of the Netherlands,[11] although it is not the seat of the government, which is The Hague.[12] Amsterdam has a population of 844,667 within the city proper, 1,343,647 in the urban area,[13] and 2,431,000 in the Amsterdam metropolitan area.[8] The city is located in the province of North Holland in the west of the country. The metropolitan area comprises much of the northern part of the Randstad, one of the larger conurbations in Europe, with a population of approximately 7 million

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Coca-Cola McCann Sarajevo Designed Sarajevo Film Festival Edition Aluminum Bottle Bosnia and Herzegovina 2016




















McCann Sarajevo Designed Sarajevo Film Festival Edition of Coca-Cola Bottle

Coca-Cola HBC BiH and the Sarajevo Film Festival have marked two important anniversaries - Coca-Cola’s fortieth anniversary of doing business in Bosnia and Herzegovina and the twentieth anniversary of its partnership with the festival - by signing a new three-year cooperation contract and introduction of limited edition of its bottle, courtesy of McCann Sarajevo.


According to the agency, the bottle is designed to celebrate “magic that has been connecting people for more than 20 years”. It comes in typical Coca-Cola red colour that also symbolises the red carpet at SFF’s location (National theatre).

“We have supported the film industry, SFF and everything that matters to Sarajevo and BiH. As one of the world leaders in marketing innovation and with help from McCann Sarajevo, we created a limited edition of Coca-Cola bottle, made of aluminium. The bottle celebrates our partnership with the Festival, creativity, art and of course Sarajevo Film Festival itself,” said Lejla Zorlak, Franchise Manager at Coca-Cola BiH. Zorlak has been working with SFF since festival’s inception.

“SFF symbols, red carpet which is passed by the stars and National theatre, at which the biggest festival titles are broadcasted and enjoyed by the audience, and where the movie award ceremonies take place,” said Maida Hambo, art director at McCann Sarajevo. “These were the main motives when designing the bottle and affected the choice of the elements I incorporated in design that symbolises the partnership between two successful brands, Coca-Cola and Sarajevo Film Festival.”

The bottle was designed solely for the Festival and could be bought only for the time being of the Festival. Now can be purchased as a souvenir by collectors.