Sunday, August 14, 2016

Coca-Cola UEFA Eurocup Aluminum Bottle Hungary 2016







The flag of Spain (Spanish: Bandera de España, colloquially known as "la Rojigualda"), as it is defined in the Spanish Constitution of 1979, consists of three horizontal stripes: red, yellow and red, the yellow stripe being twice the size of each red stripe. Traditionally, the middle stripe was defined by the more archaic term of gualda, and hence the popular name rojigualda (red-weld).

The origin of the current flag of Spain is the naval ensign of 1785, Pabellón de la Marina de Guerra under Charles III of Spain. It was chosen by Charles III himself among 12 different flags designed by Antonio Valdés y Bazán (all projected flags were presented in a drawing which is in the Naval Museum of Madrid). The flag remained marine for much of the next 50 years, flying over coastal fortresses, marine barracks and other naval property. During the Peninsular War the flag could also be found on marine regiments fighting inland. Not until 1820 was the first Spanish land unit (The La Princesa Regiment) provided with one and it was not until 1843 that Queen Isabella II of Spain would make the flag official.

Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the color scheme of the flag remained intact, with the exception of the Second Republic period (1931–1939); the only changes centered on the coat of arms.







The nation of Hungary originated from the national freedom movement from before 1848, which culminated in the Hungarian Revolution of 1848. The revolution was not only in opposition against the monarchy but also the Habsburg Empire, as well as to form an independent republic. Accordingly, the Hungarian flag features a tricolour element, which is based upon the French flag, as a reflection of the ideas of the French revolution; while red, white, and green are colours derived from the historical Hungarian coat of arms, which have essentially remained in the same form since the mid-15th century, with exception to some minor differences, and were marshalled from arms that first appeared in the late 12th and early 13th century as arms of the Árpáds, Hungary's founding dynasty. The stripes are horizontal rather than vertical to prevent confusion with the Italian flag, which had also been designed after the French flag. According to other data, the recent form of the Hungarian tricolour had been already used from 1608 at the coronation of Mathias II of Hungary.

Folklore of the romantic period attributed the colours to virtues: red for strength, white for faithfulness and green for hope. Alternatively, red for the blood spilled for the fatherland, white for freedom and green for the land, for the pastures of Hungary. The new constitution, which took effect on 1 January 2012, makes the ex-post interpretation mentioned first official (in the semi-official translation: strength (erő), fidelity (hűség) and hope (remény)).








The national flag of France is a tricolour flag featuring three vertical bands coloured blue (hoist side), white, and red. It is known to English speakers as the French Tricolour or simply the Tricolour (French: Tricolore).

The royal government used many flags, the best known being a blue shield and gold fleur-de-lis (the Royal Arms of France) on a white background, or state flag. Early in the French Revolution, the Paris militia, which played a prominent role in the storming of the Bastille, wore a cockade of blue and red,[citation needed] the city's traditional colours. According to Lafayette, white, the "ancient French colour", was added to the militia cockade to create a tricolour, or national, cockade.[1] This cockade became part of the uniform of the National Guard, which succeeded the militia and was commanded by Lafayette.[citation needed] The colours and design of the cockade are the basis of the Tricolour flag, adopted in 1790.[citation needed] The only difference was that the 1790 flag's colours were reversed. A modified design by Jacques-Louis David was adopted in 1794. The royal white flag was used during the Bourbon restoration from 1815 to 1830; the tricolour was brought back into use after the July Revolution and has been used ever since 1830.



The flag of Germany is a tricolour consisting of three equal horizontal bands displaying the national colours of Germany: black, red, and gold. The flag was first adopted as the national flag of modern Germany in 1919, during the Weimar Republic.

Germany has two competing traditions of national colours, black-red-gold and black-white-red, which have played an important role in the modern history of Germany. The black-red-gold tricolour first appeared in the early 19th century and achieved prominence during the 1848 Revolutions. The short-lived Frankfurt Parliament of 1848–1850 proposed the tricolour as a flag for a united and democratic German state. With the formation of the Weimar Republic after World War I, the tricolour was adopted as the national flag of Germany. Following World War II, the tricolour was designated as the flag of both West and East Germany in 1949. The two flags were identical until 1959, when the East German flag was augmented with the coat of arms of East Germany. Since reunification on 3 October 1990, the black-red-gold tricolour has become the flag of reunified Germany.

After the Austro-Prussian War in 1866, the Prussian-dominated North German Confederation adopted a tricolour of black-white-red as its flag. This flag later became the flag of the German Empire, formed following the unification of Germany in 1871, and was used until 1918. Black, white, and red were reintroduced as the German national colours with the establishment of Nazi Germany in 1933, replacing German republican colours with imperial colours until the end of World War II.

The colours of the modern flag are associated with the republican democracy formed after World War I, and represent German unity and freedom.[2] During the Weimar Republic, the black-red-gold colours were the colours of the democratic, centrist, and republican political parties, as seen in the name of Reichsbanner Schwarz-Rot-Gold, formed by members of the Social Democratic, the Centre, and the Democratic parties to defend the republic against extremists on the right and left.






Monday, August 8, 2016

Coca-Cola London Eye Aluminum Bottle UK 2016



























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The Coca-Cola London Eye: a new sponsorship

Since it was officially opened on 31 December, 1999, the London Eye has become a focal point for national moments such as the Millennium celebrations, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.
So we were incredibly excited to become official sponsor of the iconic Thameside landmark in January 2015, and we look forward to playing a big part in future moments of happiness and celebration in London.


Sunday, July 31, 2016

Coca-Cola Dubrovnik Aluminum Bottle Croatia 2016










Coca Cola Designs a Special Bottle Dedicated to Dubrovnik!


Limited edition bottles with the outlines of Rome, London, and our very own Dubrovnik will be available in shops and cafes in the first week of July.

This summer, you will be able to take a piece of Dubrovnik home with you in a form of a brand new Coca-Cola bottle. Specially designed bottles of one of the world’s most recognizable soft drinks include the outline of Dubrovnik was officially presented in Lazareti on June 27, 2016.

Along with Dubrovnik, two other cities will have their own bottle – Rome and London while Paris and Venice, though they both took part in the competition, did not make the final cut.

Mayor of Dubrovnik Andro Vlahusic did not try to hide his excitement with the latest recognition of Dubrovnik: “This gift is symbolic but also beautiful. Just because something is not grandiose doesn’t mean it cannot be beautiful. Just like Coca Cola doesn’t come in a 5-litre bottle, Dubrovnik is not a city with 5 million residents. We consider Coca-Cola to be our long term partner and Dubrovnik deserves to partner with the world’s largest brands” he said, thinking the representatives of Coca-Cola Croatia on their hard work over the last few years in order to convince the central office in Atlanta to select Dubrovnik as one of the cities in their latest campaign.

Regional sales manager Jaksa Maganic was also happy with the cooperation and the fact that the city of Dubrovnik recognized this project and supported it: “We connected one of the most recognizable brands in the world and one of the greatest symbols of Croatia. We are now rubbing shoulders with Rome and London” he said and reminded everyone at the presentation that this is not the first time Dubrovnik and Coca Cola are connected: “15 years ago, Coca Cola’s glass bottle had a label that was designed by Dubrovnik designers, and a percentage of sales was donated to refurbish Knezev Dvor”. “

New limited edition bottles with the outline of Dubrovnik will be available in souvenir shops and cafes in Dubrovnik as of July 1, 2016. 







Dubrovnik has a new fountain! Actually, it has a replica of Onofrio's fountain made by 2,500 empty Coca-Cola bottles. After making Coca-Cola bottles with the image of Dubrovnik on them, this project connects Dubrovnik and Coca-Cola even more. The idea is that citizens and tourists colour the bottles and make the fountain creative and artistic.

The Mayor of Dubrovnik, Andro Vlahusic said that Dubrovnik is currently in the process of 'hyper branding'.

- If you think about a drink, you think about Coca-Cola, if you think about a hero, you think about Robin Hood, if you think about an airline, you think about Turkish airlines, if you think about a football club, you think about Real Madrid – said the mayor, alluding that Dubrovnik has it all. He thanked Coca-Cola for recognizing the value of Dubrovnik.

Jaksa Maganic, the sales manager for this region, Coca - Cola HBC Croatia, said that this is the new idea that should connect Dubrovnik and Coca-Cola even more.

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